Christmas - Perfect Gravy recipes

Author: Alfred Sims  

So the French still, to this day, have only sauce or jus (juices), whilst the British have gravy, which is a sauce made from juices and other ingredients. But it has to be said that gravy is part of our heritage; it comes from a long line of careful cooks who knew how to prepare a perfectly flavoured sauce by utilising precious juices, adding thickening for creamy smoothness and other flavour-enhancing ingredients to provide a beautiful sauce.

Roast Ribs of Aberdeen Angus Beef (with a Confit of Whole Garlic and Shallots)

Roast Ribs of Aberdeen Angus Beef (with a Confit of Whole Garlic and Shallots)
For those underwhelmed by turkey, Christmas is a time to splash out on a really good, well-hung joint of the best Aberdeen Angus. The confit (see related recipe below), is superb to serve with it and is something really different from the usual horseradish.
Provided by: Delia Smith
Total time: 50 minutes
Cook time: 50 minutes
Yields: 8 servings
Cuisine: General
Number of ingredients: 9
Ingredients:
  • a three-rib piece of trimmed sirloin of beef (about 2.7kg)
  • 1 small onion, peeled and halved
  • 1 dessertspoon mustard powder
  • 1 dessertspoon plain flour
  • 425ml red wine
  • freshly milled black pepper
  • 1 heaped tablespoon plain flour
  • 570ml vegetable stock (from potatoes or other vegetables)
  • 300ml full-bodied red wine
How to cook:
  1. Place the beef, just as it is, upright in a roasting tin, tucking in the onion halves alongside it.
  2. Combine the mustard powder and flour, then dust this all over the surface of the fat, and finally season with a few twists of freshly milled pepper. This floury surface will help to make the fat very crusty (for those like me who want to eat what I call the 'crispies'), while the onion will caramelise to give the gravy a rich colour and flavour. Place the joint in the oven - it will have plenty of fat, so don't add extra.
  3. After 20 minutes turn the heat down to 190°C/gas mark 5 and continue to cook for 15 minutes per 450g for rare, plus 15 minutes extra for medium rare or 30 minutes extra for well done. While cooking, baste the meat with the juices at least three times. To see if the beef is cooked to your liking, insert a thin skewer and press out some juices: the red, pink or clear colour will indicate to what stage the beef has cooked.
  4. Remove the cooked beef to a board for carving and leave it to rest for at least 30 minutes before serving (while it's resting you can increase the heat in the oven to finish the roast potatoes if you're serving them). This resting period allows most of the juices which have bubbled up to the surface of the meat to seep back in and the meat itself firms up to make it easier to carve.
  5. To make the gravy, spoon off most of the fat from the corner of the tilted meat tin. Place over a medium heat and sprinkle the flour into the fatty juices. Then, with a wire whisk, blend in the flour using a circular movement. When you have a smooth paste, slowly add the vegetable stock, whisking all the time and scraping the base of the tin to incorporate all the residue from the roast. Once the gravy has started to bubble, add the red wine. Let the gravy continue to bubble and reduce very gently, then taste to check the seasoning. Turn the heat down low and, after you have carved the beef, add any escaped juices to it before pouring into a warmed serving jug. Not sure how to make gravy? Take a look at our Cookery School Video on this page to see how it's done.
Notes: 【How to】 Cook Roast Beef Delia Smith, Here you may to know how to cook roast beef delia smith. Watch the video explanation about Delia Smith's Christmas Roast Beef Recipe Video Online, article,

Delia Smith's Christmas Roast Beef Recipe Video

If you're bored of the same old turkey every year at Christmas, then why not try Delia Smith's Duration: 0:40

Delia Smith's Winter Collection: Episode 7

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Perfect Gravy

Perfect Gravy
Want to find the perfect gravy recipe? Here Delia tells us about the history of gravy, and how to make it. You can also watch how to make gravy in our Cookery School Video. What is gravy? Apparently, originally in the 14th Century it was a bit of a copy error. The French (who by no means have the last word in cooking) had the word grane, and someone at some stage mistakenly copied over the 'n' as a 'v' and for some unknown reason the English kept the 'v' and added a 'y'. Thus, in a 14th-century cookbook we find oysters, for instance, were stewed 'in their own gravy', meaning with their own juices, plus wine broth, almonds and rice flour, and similar gravies appeared from then on. So the French still, to this day, have only sauce or jus (juices), whilst the British have gravy, which is a sauce made from juices and other ingredients. So in all our most prestigious cookbooks, literature, food journalists and diaries throughout the centuries, gravy is prominently featured. British sauce: it is therefore hardly surprising that even our modern generation undboutedly still has a latent passion for it. True, if you're a food snob, the word does not have such a fashionable ring to it as the French jus that dominates restaurant menus, along with perfumed broths, essences and other such pretensions. But it has to be said that gravy is part of our heritage; it comes from a long line of careful cooks who knew how to prepare a perfectly flavoured sauce by utilising precious juices, adding thickening for creamy smoothness and other flavour-enhancing ingredients to provide a beautiful sauce. Gravy again: Now we can come the crux of all this, and that is how, since everyone wants to enjoy proper gravy, they are at the same time deeply afraid of attempting to make it. I have written about it and demonstrated it countless times, but still people ask, 'How do you make gravy?'. Here at the Delia Online Cookery School we can show just how easy it is, click the image to watch our video
Provided by: Delia Smith
Yields: 570 items
Cuisine: General
Number of ingredients: 3
Ingredients:
  • 1 rounded tablespoon sauce flour or plain flour
  • 570ml hot stock (potato or other vegetable water or marigold bouillion for example) but the exact amount will depend on how thick you like your gravy
  • salt and pepper
How to cook:
  1. First of all remove the meat or poultry from the roasting tin.
  2. Place the tin over a gentle direct heat, and have a bowl ready, then tilt the tin and you will see quite clearly the fat separating from the darker juices. So now you need to spoon off the fat into the bowl using a tablespoon, but remember, you need to leave 1-1½ tablespoons of fat, along with all the juices, in the tin. Now let the fat and juices begin to bubble, turn the heat up to medium, use a wooden spoon to scrape all the crusty bits from the base of the tin, adding a rounded tablespoon of sauce flour. Then using circular movements, with the wooden spoon, blend it into the fat, juices and crusty bits as quickly as you can.
  3. Speed is of the essence – gentle, faint-hearted stirring is not what’s needed here: you should be mixing in the manner of a speeded up film! When the flour is absorbed you will have a smooth paste, so now begin to add the hot stock, a little at a time, whisking briskly and blending after each addition. Now switch to a balloon whisk and you will find that, as the stock is added, and it reaches simmering point, the gravy will have thickened. Now your own preference comes into play. If the gravy is too thin, let it bubble and reduce a little; if it's too thick, add a little more liquid. If you want to improve the colour just add a drop of gravy browning and just whisk it in. Finally, taste and season with salt and freshly milled black pepper. Then pour the gravy into a warmed jug ready for the table.
  4. For pork, which has pale juices, add onion to the roasting tin. This will caramelise during cooking and give colour to the juices. The onion may also be used with other joints and poultry to give colour.
  5. For lamb, add a teaspoon of mustard powder with the flour, a tablespoon of redcurrant jelly to melt into the gravy, and some red wine to add body.
  6. For duck, add the grated zest and juice of a small orange, along with a glass of port.
  7. For beef, add a wineglass of Sercial Madeira – this enriches the beef flavour magically.
Notes: Roast Ribs of Aberdeen Angus Beef (with a Confit of Whole Garlic, Place the beef, just as it is, upright in a roasting tin, tucking in the onion halves alongside it. Combine the mustard powder and flour, then dust this all

Beef in Barolo with Parmesan Mashed Potatoes

Beef in Barolo with Parmesan Mashed Potatoes
This is a classic from Piedmont but because Barolo is such a very fine and quite expensive wine, I tend to make this with something less costly but from the same region. Then splash out and buy a bottle of Barolo to drink with it.
Provided by: Delia Smith
Total time: 180 minutes
Cook time: 180 minutes
Yields: 6 servings
Cuisine: General
Number of ingredients: 14
Ingredients:
  • 2 lb 8 oz (1.15 kg) piece of braising steak or brisket, rolled and tied
  • salt and freshly milled black pepper
  • 12 fl oz (340 ml) red wine, made from the nebbiolo grape or a barbera d'Albi or d'Asti - see intro
  • 2 dessertspoons olive oil
  • 4 oz (110 g) carrot, peeled and chopped
  • 4 oz (110 g) celery, chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3lb (1.35kg) Desiree or Kind Edward potatoes
  • 8fl oz (225g) hot milk
  • 6oz (175g) grated Parmesan
  • salt and frehly milled black pepper
How to cook:
  1. If you have time, it's good to marinate the beef.
  2. Place it in a deep small pot that just fits it, then pour the wine over and leave it for 24 hours, turning it over once during that time. To cook the beef, pre-heat the oven to gas mark 1, 275F (140C) and then heat 1 dessertspoon of the oil in a large, solid frying pan. Take the beef out of the marinade (reserve the wine) and dry the meat thoroughly with paper towels.
  3. Season it with salt and pepper and, when the oil is very hot, brown the beef on all sides, turning it around until it's browned. Then remove it to a plate, heat the rest of the oil and add the prepared vegetables and garlic to the pan and toss them around until they have turned brown at the edges.
  4. Now place the beef and vegetables in the casserole, pour in the reserved marinade and add the rosemary and the bay leaves. Then bring it up to simmering point, put a tight-fitting lid on, and transfer the casserole to the oven for 3 hours, turning the meat over at half time.
  5. For the Parmesan mash, all you do is steam the potatoes, cut into even-sized pieces, for 20-25 minutes until tender. Then, with an electric hand whisk, beat in the milk and Parmesan cheese with a good seasoning of salt and pepper till the potatoes are light and fluffy.
  6. To serve, remove the meat to a carving board, then remove and discard the bay leaves and whiz the vegetables and juices in a blender to make a smooth sauce. Taste to check the seasoning and serve the meat, cut into slices, with the sauce poured over.
  7. In Italy, it is traditional to serve this with carrots.
Notes: How to grill and fry meat, Approximate timings for grilling meat are as follows: steak 1 inch (2.5 cm) thick (ie sirloin or rump) – 1½-2 minutes on each side for rare; 3 minutes on each

Devilled Spare Ribs

Devilled Spare Ribs
Now it's so easy to buy thick, meaty spare ribs, you can make this doddle of a recipe in no time at all. The sauce takes about 5 minutes to make and the rest all happens in the oven. The sauce works superbly with the ribs, but it's also excellent, if you prefer, cooked in exactly the same way using pork streaky rashers, in which case the same quantities will serve three or four.
Provided by: Delia Smith
Total time: 70 minutes
Cook time: 70 minutes
Yields: 2 servings
Cuisine: General
Number of ingredients: 13
Ingredients:
  • 3 lb (1.35 kg) spare ribs
  • 2 teaspoons runny honey
  • 2 teaspoons freshly grated ginger
  • 1 level teaspoon ground ginger
  • freshly milled black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 2 fat cloves garlic, peeled
  • 2 level teaspoons salt
  • 10 fl oz (275 ml) red wine
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 2 rounded tablespoons tomato purée
  • 2 rounded teaspoons mustard powder
How to cook:
  1. First of all, lay the ribs in the base of the tin, brushing them with oil and seasoning with black pepper.
  2. Then make the sauce by simply crushing the garlic with the salt to a paste using a pestle and mortar, then whisking it together with all the other ingredients – use a balloon whisk and it will all be amalgamated in moments. Pour the sauce all over the ribs, making sure each one gets a good coating. Then pop them on to the highest shelf of the oven, bake them for 45 minutes, then give them all a basting and cook for a further 25 minutes.
  3. Serve the ribs with the lovely thick reduced sauce spooned over, and I think they are very good served with some rice and a salad.
Notes: Traditional Roast Sirloin of Beef, Place the beef, just as it is, upright in a roasting tin, tucking in the half onion alongside it. Combine the mustard powder and flour, then dust this all over
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